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Schlagwort-Archiv: critically endangered

10 good reasons to travel to Madagascar

10 gute Gründe, nach Madagaskar zu reisen

#1 Baobabs: Madagascar’s legendary Baobab Alley is located in the west of the island. The mighty trees with their impressive silhouettes are famous all over the world. On Madagascar there are seven different species of Baobabs, on earth, there are only eight species in total. Discover the Baobab forests of Andavadoaka and visit the “Mother of the forest” in Tsimanampetsotsa! …

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Mysterious and nocturnal: The Votsotsa

A very special inhabitant of Madagascar is the Votsotsa. It looks like a mixture of a rabbit, a kangaroo, and a rat. Big ears, cute black button eyes, a partly jumping locomotion, and a hardly hairy, narrow tail. In fact, the Votsotsa belongs to the Madagascar rats, a separate genus that only lives in Madagascar. It is the largest rodent …

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The real treasures of Madagascar

Astrochelys yniphora

An arched, golden shell, relatively long legs and alert, black, shining eyes: That is how the most precious tortoise on Earth looks like. It comes from Madagascar and is named ploughshare tortoise (Astrochelys yniphora) due to the large bony appendage on its breast shell. It serves males to turn over contrahents or females during mating season. And this is quite …

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The fruit gourmets: Black-and-white Ruffed Lemurs

Varecia variegata

Many people know them from zoos and animal parks: Black-and-white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata). Besides Red Ruffed Lemurs and the Indri, they belong to the largest lemurs with a head-torso length of 40 to 60 cm, an additional 60 cm added for the tail. Weights of 3 to 4 kg are the average. Black-and-white ruffed lemurs exclusively live in the …

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The rarest lemur on Earth: Perrier’s Sifaka

Practically the counterpart to the white Silky Sifaka is the closely related Black Sifaka or Perrier’s Sifaka (Propithecus perrieri). With a height of 85 to 92 cm and a weight of three to six kilograms, it belongs to the larger lemurs, with the tail accounting for up to 46 cm of its total length. Suitably to the name these animals …

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